» » France Gall - Paris, France

France Gall - Paris, France album flac


Performer: France Gall
Genre: Electronic / Rock / Pop
Title: Paris, France
Released: 1980
Style: Chanson, Pop Rock
FLAC version ZIP size: 1372 mb
MP3 version ZIP size: 1492 mb
WMA version ZIP size: 1393 mb
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 645
Other Formats: AC3 MP1 WAV WMA MIDI AA MMF

Isabelle Geneviève Marie Anne Gall (French pronunciation: ; 9 October 1947 – 7 January 2018), better known by her stage name France Gall, was a French yé-yé singer. In 1965, aged 17, she won the Eurovision Song Contest. Between 1973 and 1992, she collaborated with singer-songwriter Michel Berger. Gall was born in Paris on 9 October 1947, to a highly musical family. Her father, the lyricist Robert Gall, wrote songs for Édith Piaf and Charles Aznavour.

France Gall (born Isabelle Geneviève Marie Anne Gall on 9 October, 1947 in Paris, France - died 7 January 2018) was an influential singer who performed for many decades. She notably represented Luxembourg in the 1965 Eurovision Song Contest with "Poupée de Cire, Poupée de Son"; that winning song was just one of many that she performed which had been written by Serge Gainsbourg. Her career spanned roughly forty years, primarily in France, but she was best known over the world for the songs which she performed during the 60s, many of them a part of the ye-ye style.

Paris, France (album). Studio album by France Gall. May 19, 1980 (1980-05-19). Anti-terrorism demonstration on Place de la République after ''Charlie Hebdo'' shooting (11 January 2015). A record producer or track producer or music producer oversees and manages the sound recording and production of a band.

France Gall - Paris, France. Discography: France Gall. Palais Des Sports 82 (2013). Mes Débuts (Remastered) (2019). Das Beste: Ihre Deutschen Hits (2019). France Gall CDStory (2001).

Poupée De Cire, Poupée De Son. 2018. 11. 10. 12. lossless. 14. 15. Tout pour la musique. 08. 07.

France is a studio album by French singer France Gall, released in March 1993. All tracks written by Michel Berger, except where noted.